Fundamentals of stock market- key financial ratios

The Fundamentals of Stock Market- Must Know Terms

Here are the few key financial terms that a stock market investor must know. Although the list is long, it will be worth to know these terms to get a good grasp on the fundamentals. Here it goes:


Promoter’s shares: – The company shares that are owned by the promoters i.e. the owners of the company is called Promoters shares. The public cannot own these shares.


Outstanding shares: The company’s shares that are owned by all its shareholders, including share blocks held by institutional investors and restricted shares owned by the company’s officers and insiders.

Public (retail investors), foreign institutional investors (FII), Domestic institutional investors (DII), mutual funds etc. can own outstanding shares.


Market Capitalization: – Market Cap or Market capitalization refers to the total market value of a company’s outstanding shares. It is calculated by multiplying a company’s shares outstanding by the current market price of one share. The investment community uses this figure to determine a company’s size, as opposed to using sales or total asset figures. In general, market capitalization is the market value of company outstanding shares.

Market Capitalization = No of outstanding shares * share value of each stock


Book value: – It is the ratio of total value of company assets to the no of shares. In general, this is the value which the shareholders will get if the company is liquidated. Hence, it is always preferred to buy a stock with high book value compared to the current share price.

Book Value = [Total assets – Intangible assets (patents, goodwill..) – liabilities]


Earnings Per Share (EPS): This is one of the key ratios and is really important to understand before we study other ratios. EPS is the profit that a company has made over the last year divided by how many shares are on the market. Preferred shares are not included while calculating EPS. In general, Money earned per outstanding shares.

Earnings Per Share (EPS) = (Net income – dividends from preferred stock)/(Total outstanding shares)

From the perspective of an investor, it is always better to invest in a company with higher EPS as it means that the company is generating greater profits.


Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E):  The Price to Earnings ratio is one of the most widely used financial ratio analysis among the investors for a very long time. A high P/E ratio generally shows that the investor is paying more for the share. As a thumb rule, a low P/E ratio is preferred while buying a stock, but the definition of ‘low’ varies from industries to industries. So, different sectors (Ex Automobile, Banks etc) have different P/E ratios for the companies in their sector, and comparing the P/E ratio of the company of one sector with P/E ratio of the company of another sector will be insignificant. However, you can use the P/E ratio to compare the companies in the same sector, preferring one with low P/E. The P/E ratio is calculated using this formula:

Price to Earnings Ratio= (Price Per Share) / ( Earnings Per Share)

It’s easier to find the find the price of the share as you can find it from the current closing stock price. For the earning per share, we can have either trailing EPS (earnings per share based on the past 12 months) or Forward EPS (Estimated basic earnings per share based on a forward 12-month projection. It’s easier to find the trailing EPS as we already have the result of the past 12 month’s performance of the company.

If you want to read further in details, I will recommend you to read this book: Everything You Wanted to Know About Stock Market Investing -Best selling book for stock market beginners. 


Price to Book Ratio (P/B): Price to Book Ratio (P/B) is calculated by dividing the current price of the stock by the latest quarter’s book value per share. P/B ratio is an indication of how much shareholders are paying for the net assets of a company. Generally, a lower P/B ratio could mean that the stock is undervalued, but again the definition of lower varies from sector to sector.

Price to Book Ratio = (Price per Share)/( Book Value per Share)


Dividend yield: – It is the portion of the company earnings decided by the company to distribute to the shareholders. A stock’s dividend yield is calculated as the company’s annual cash dividend per share divided by the current price of the stock and is expressed in annual percentage. It can be distributed quarterly or annually basis and they can issue in the form of cash or stocks.

Dividend Yield = (Dividend per Share) / (Price per Share)*100

For Example, If the share price of a company is Rs 100 and it is giving a dividend of Rs 10, then the dividend yield will be 10%. It totally depends on the investor whether he wants to invest in a high or a low dividend yielding company.

Also Read: 4 Must Know Dates for a Dividend Stock Investor


Market lot: – It is the minimum no of shares required to purchase or sell to carry a transaction.


Face value: – It is the price of the stock written in the company’s books when issued during IPO. It is the amount of money that the holder of a debt instrument receives back from the issuer on the debt instrument’s maturity date. Face value is also referred to as par value or principal.


Dividend % – This is the ratio of the dividend given by the company to the face value of the share.


Basic EPS: – This is nothing but Earnings per share.


Diluted EPS: – If all the convertible securities such as convertible preferred shares, convertible debentures, stock options, bonds etc. are converted into outstanding shares then the Earnings per share is called Diluted earnings per share. The less the difference between Basic and diluted EPS the more the company is preferable.


Cash EPS: – This is the ratio of cash generated by the company per diluted outstanding share. If Cash EPS is more the more the company is preferred.

Cash EPS  = Cash flows / no of diluted outstanding shares


PBDIT:  Profit before depreciation, interest, and taxes.


PBIT: – Profit before interest and taxes


PBT: – Profit before taxes


PBDIT margin: – It is the ratio of PBDIT to the revenue.


Net profit margin: – It is the ratio of Net profit to the revenue.


Assets: – Asset is an economic value that a company controls with an expectation that it will provide future benefit.


Liability: It is an obligation that the company has to pay in future due to its past actions like borrowing money in terms of loans for business expansion purpose.

Assets = Liabilities + Shareholders equity


Asset turnover ratio: – It is calculated by dividing revenue to the total assets


Debt to Equity Ratio: The debt-to-equity ratio measures the relationship between the amount of capital that has been borrowed (i.e. debt) and the amount of capital contributed by shareholders (i.e. equity). Generally, as a firm’s debt-to-equity ratio increases, it becomes riskier A lower debt-to-equity number means that a company is using less leverage and has a stronger equity position.

Debt to Equity Ratio =(Total Liabilities)/(Total Shareholder Equity)


Return on Equity (ROE): Return on equity (ROE) is the amount of net income returned as a percentage of shareholders equity. Return on equity measures a corporation’s profitability by revealing how much profit a company generates with the money shareholders has invested. In other words, ROE tells you how good a company is at rewarding its shareholders for their investment.

Return on Equity = (Net Income)/(Average Stockholder Equity)


Price to Sales Ratio (P/S): The stock’s price/sales ratio (P/S) ratio measures the price of a company’s stock against its annual sales. P/S ratio is another stock valuation indicator similar to the P/E ratio.

Price to Sales Ratio = (Price per Share)/(Annual Sales Per Share)

The P/S ratio is a great tool because sales figures are considered to be relatively reliable while other income statement items, like earnings, can be easily manipulated by using different accounting rules.


Current Ratio: Current ratio is a key financial ratio for evaluating a company’s liquidity. It measures the proportion of current assets available to cover current liabilities. It is a company’s ability to pay its short-term liabilities with its short-term assets. If the ratio is over 1.0, the firm has more short-term assets than short-term debts. But if the current ratio is less than 1.0, the opposite is true and the company could be vulnerable

Current Ratio = (Current Assets)/(Current Liabilities)


Quick ratio:  The name itself tells quick means how well the company can meet its short-term financial liabilities.  The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet its short-term obligations with its most liquid assets.

Quick Ratio = (Cash + Marketable Securities + Accounts Receivable) / Current Liabilities.


Note: This content is published by a guest author- Anjani Badam.

What is Mutual Fund? Definition, Types, Benefits & More.

A mutual fund is a collective investment that pools together the money of a large number of investors to purchase a number of securities like stocks, bonds etc.

When you purchase a share in the mutual fund, you have a small stake in all investments included in that fund. Hence, by owning a mutual fund, the investor participates in gains or losses of all the companies in the fund. For instance, you can take a mutual fund as a basket of investments. When you purchase a share of that mutual fund, you are buying one share of this basket and hence has an ownership in the all the investments in one such basket.

how mutual funds work

Image source: Corporatefinanceinstitute.com

Major Types of Mutual Funds:

Based on Asset Class

  1. Equity FundsThese funds invest the amassed money from investors in equities i.e. the stocks of different companies. The associated risks for these funds are comparatively higher as they invest in the market. However, they also provide higher returns.
  2. Debt Funds: These funds invest in debt instruments like bonds, securities, fixed income assets, the company’s debentures etc. They provide a safer investment option for investors looking for small regular returns with low risk.
  3. Hybrid Funds: As the name suggests, Hybrid or balanced funds invests in both equity and debt instruments like stocks, bonds etc. This ratio can be variable or fixed depending on the fund. This fund helps to bridge the gap between entirely equity or debt fund and suitable for investors looking to take higher risk than debt funds in order to get bigger rewards.
  4. Money Market Funds: These funds invest in liquid instruments such as bonds, T-bills, certificate of deposits etc. The risks associated with these funds are relatively low and suitable for short-term investments, less than 12 months.

Based on Structure

  1. Open End Funds: The majority of mutual funds in India are open-end funds. These funds are not listed on the stock exchanges are available for subscription through the fund. Hence, the investors have the flexibility to buy and sell these funds at any time at the current asset value price indicated by the mutual fund.
  2. Closed-End Funds:- These funds are listed on the stock exchange. They have a fixed number of outstanding shares and operate for a fixed duration. The fund is open for subscription only during a specified period. These funds also terminate on a specified date. Hence, the investors can redeem their units only on a specified date.

types of mutual funds

(Image Credits: Kotak Securities)

Benefits of Mutual funds:

There are a couple of benefits in investing in a mutual fund.

For example, if there is an investor who wants to invest in stocks but has no time to analyze and create a portfolio. Then he can be benefited from the mutual fund. This investor just has to buy a mutual fund and hence, in a single purchase he gets an investment similar to purchasing the entire portfolio of stocks.

mutual funds trade brains5

The various benefits of investing in a mutual fund are described below:

  • A simple way to make a diversified investment: A mutual fund has a number of securities like stocks, bonds, fixed etc already in its portfolio. Therefore, buying a mutual fund is a simple way to make a diversified investment. Further, diversification also reduces risk which is an added benefit of buying a mutual fund.
  • Managed by a financial professional: The Fund manager or managers actively manage a mutual fund. They try to give the maximum returns to the investors using their professional expertise. Hence, those investors who don’t have time to invest by their own can get benefits from the expertise of these fund managers.
  • Allow investors to participate in a wide variety of investments: This is one of the greatest advantages of buying a mutual fund. There are a variety of mutual funds available to invest in equity fund (Index funds, growth funds, etc.), fixed income funds, income tax saver funds, balanced funds etc. An investor can easily select the best one which suits his strategy.
  • Investors can buy/sell/increase/decrease their mutual funds whenever they want: There is great flexibility to for the investors while investing in mutual funds. They can easily buy, sell, increase or decrease their investment in different funds within seconds. However, please note that it’s suggested to read the mutual fund prospectus carefully before subscribing as some mutual funds have an entry or exit-load.

If you are new to mutual fund investing and want to learn from scratch, I highly recommed you to check out this online course: Investing in Mutual Funds? A Beginner’s Course.

Which mutual fund to buy?

After understanding the benefits of a mutual fund, the next question is which mutual fund to buy? There is a variety of mutual funds available in the market which you can find online. These mutual funds have different ratings & rankings and you can choose a suitable mutual fund according to your goal. Here are the two few sites where you can search online:

Generally, you need to read the prospectus of a mutual fund which gives a wide variety of information about the fund. The fund prospectus has details like fee & charges, minimum investment amount, performance history, risks, and other particulars. Here are the few examples of mutual funds (provided by moneycontrol website):mutual funds trade brains2

Disadvantages of Mutual Funds:

Here are the few disadvantages of buying a mutual fund:

  • Fees and Expenses: There are a couple of possible fees in mutual funds like expense fee, exit fees etc which might reduce the overall returns.
  • No Insurance: There is no guarantee of success in the mutual funds. The mutual fund providing companies always state the following in the declaimer in their advertisements:
  • Mediocre Performance: On an average, a majority of mutual funds are not able to beat the market indices.
  • Loss of Control: The fund managers are responsible for buying and selling of the securities and you have no say in managing the portfolio. You are trusting someone else with your money when you invest in mutual funds.

mutual funds trade brains 1

How to make money by the mutual fund?

There are basically two ways to make money by a mutual fund –

  1. Appreciation: When the mutual fund appreciates i.e. when the fund grows in value. You can sell the mutual fund at the appreciated value and get a good return on your investment.
  2. Dividend Payment: Mutual funds also provide dividends to the investors when they receive the dividend from the companies they own in their portfolio. Please read the prospectus carefully if you are buying a mutual fund for dividend payments.

Also read: Growth vs Dividend Mutual Funds: Which one is better?

So, that’s all for the basics of the mutual fund. In the next post, I will describe how to buy a mutual fund.

In the meantime, if you need any help or have any doubts, feel free to comment below. I will be happy to help you.

The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham Summary & Book Review cover 2

The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham Summary & Book Review

The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham, also referred as the bible of the stock market, was originally written in 1949 by Benjamin Graham, a legendary investor and also known as the father of value investingBen Graham was also the mentor and professor of well-known billionaire investor, Warren Buffett.

The 2006 revised edition of the book ‘The Intelligent Investor’ has added commentary by Jason Zweig, a famous wall-street investor, and editor. These added commentaries are used to relate Graham’s idea to the present world. It highlights that the book has time-tested techniques. The book has over 600 pages (although originally around 450-500 page but the added commentaries in revised edition increased the width of the book). Overall, it’s a classic book with added quick notes.

Why You Should Read This Book:

Warren Buffett (worth over 73.1 billion dollars) says- ‘This book is by far the best book on investing ever written’. Needless to mention that this book is Warren Buffett’s all-time favorite. He also admitted that the book helped him in developing a conceptual framework for his future investments and capital allocations. Further, he made the following remarks about the book in its preface:

  • Investing doesn’t require a stratospheric IQ, unusual business insights, or inside information. What’s needed is a sound intellectual framework for making decisions and the ability to keep emotions from corroding that framework. This book precisely and clearly prescribes the proper framework.
  • Pay special attention to chapters 8 & 20.
  • Outstanding results are based on three things – Effort, Research, amplitudes of the market (This book will allow you to profit from them, not participate)

NOTE: If you want to buy this book, I highly recommend you to buy through Amazon at this link. It’s currently on sale here- THE INTELLIGENT INVESTOR by Benjamin Graham

The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham book has many valuable concepts and a must read for all the stock market investors. The first few chapters of the book are dedicated to the general concepts of the market. As the book was originally written in 1949, the book also consists of lots of details about the bonds, preferred stocks & inflation.

The next few chapters describe the methods to analyze stocks using ratios, balance sheet, cash flow etc. The second half of the book is of more importance for the stock investors as it explains the different strategies of the defensive & enterprising investors, along with chapters on management, dividend policy, and case studies.

Please also read: 10 Must Read books for the Stock Market Investors

The three main points covered in the books:

Although there are lots of proven concepts covered in the book, however, the key three points in the book- the intelligent investor by Benjamin Graham is summarized here:

1. Investing vs. Speculating:

“An investment operation is one which, upon thorough analysis, promises safety of principal and a satisfactory return. Operations not meeting these requirements are speculative.” – Benjamin Graham

Let’s understand this concept with the help of an example. Imagine you are planning to buy a printing press. Now, to buy this company you can use two approaches.

First, you visited the company, calculated the asset value of the printing shops, checked the total income and cash flow of the company, verified the effectiveness of the managers, calculated the total assets & liabilities and then lastly come up with a final price for the printing company.

The second approach is that you met with the owner and decided to pay the price whatever he is asking for.

From the example, we can establish the difference between an investor and a speculator. The Investor follows the first approach while the speculator follows the other. Here is the key difference between these two:

Investor Speculator
Goes through proper analysis Does not meet these standards.
Considers the safety of principle ——–
Gets adequate returns ——–

Here is the quote about Speculators by Benjamin Graham:

the intelligent investor summary 5

2. The margin of Safety:

This is another one of the pronounced concept introduced by Benjamin Franklin. He says that one should always invest with a margin of safety. Let us understand this by an example.

Imagine you are in a construction business. You took an order to make a bridge, which can hold up to 8 tons. Now, as a constructor, you might consider making the bridge with an additional 2 tons of holding capacity so that it will not collapse in some extraordinary situation. Overall, you will make the bridge with a total of 10 tons of holding capacity.

Here, your additional 2 tons is the margin of safety.

In the same way, while investing we should consider this margin of safety. It is the central concept of value investing.  If you think a stock is valued at Rs 100 per share (fairly), there is no harm in giving yourself some benefit of the doubt that you may be wrong with this calculation. And hence, you should buy at Rs 70, Rs 80 or Rs 90 instead of Rs 100. Here, the difference in the calculated amount and your final price is your margin of safety.

Here is the quote about the importance of margin of safety by Benjamin Graham:

The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham

3. Mr. Market

In the book ‘The Intelligent Investor’, Graham tells a story about a man he calls Mr. Market. In the story, Mr. Market is a business partner of yours (Investors). Every day Mr. Market comes to your door and offers to either buy your stake of the partnership or sell you his stake to you.

But here’s the catch: Mr. Market is an emotional man who lets his enthusiasm and despair affect the price he is willing to buy/sell shares on any given day. Because of this, on some days he’ll come to the door feeling jubilant and will offer you a high price for your share of the business and demand a similarly high price if you want to buy his. On other days, Mr. Market will be inconsolably depressed and will be willing to sell you his stake for a very low price, but will also only give you the same lowball offer if you want to sell your stake.

On any given day, you can obviously buy or sell to Mr. Market. But, you also have the option of completely ignoring him i.e. you don’t need to trade at all with Mr. Market. If you do ignore him, he never holds it against you and always comes back the following day.

The intelligent investor will attempt to take advantage of Mr. Market by buying low and selling high.  There is no need to feel guilty for ripping off Mr. Market; after all, he is setting the price. As an intelligent investor, you are doing business with him only when it’s to your advantage. That’s all.

The key point to note here is that though Mr. Market offers some great deals from time to time. Investors just have to remain alert and ready when the offers come up.

Now, like Mr. Market, the stock market also behaves in the same manner. The market swings give an intelligent investor the opportunities to buy low and sell high. Every day we can pull up quotes for various stocks or for the entire market as a whole. If you think the prices are low in relation to value, you can buy. If you think prices are high in relation to value, you can sell. Lastly, if prices fall somewhere in the grey area in between, you’re never forced to do either.Mr. Market and Stock Market:

So, this is a value-oriented disciplined investing. Don’t fall victim to irrational exuberance if the underlying fundamentals of the company are strong. In short, do not react to the hyperboles of the market’s daily fluctuations. Don’t panic, don’t sell.

The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham

Other key points from the book The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham on the Investor and market fluctuations:

  • A common stock portfolio is certain to fluctuate over any period of time. The investor should be prepared financially and psychologically for this fluctuation. Investors might want to make a profit from market level changes. But this can lead to speculative attitudes and activities which can be dangerous. Anyways, if you want to speculate do so with eyes open, and knowledge that you will probably lose money in the end.
  • Graham’s Opinion on aggressive investing: The low probability of aggressive picks will out-weigh the gains collected over a long period of time. ‘The aggressive investor will expect to fare better than his passive equivalent, but his results may well be worse.’

That’s all. I hope this post about the ‘The Intelligent Investor Summary & Book Review’ is helpful to you. I will highly recommend you to get a copy of this book and start reading. There are many valuable concepts by Benjamin Graham that new and old stock investors should learn.

If you need any further help with the book or have any doubts- feel free to comment below. I will be happy to help you. Happy Investing!

The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham


8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know cover

8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know

8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know. The valuation of a company is a very tedious job. It’s not easy to evaluate the true worth of a company as the process takes the reading of company’s several years’ financial statements like balance sheet, profit and loss statements, cash-flow statement, Income statement etc.

Although it really tough to go through all these information, however, there are various financial ratios available which can make the life of a stock investor really simple. Using these ratios they can choose right companies to invest in or to compare the financials of two companies to find out which one is better.

This post about ‘8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know’ is divided into two parts. In the first part, I will give you the definitions and examples of these 8 financial ratios. In the second part, after financial ratio analysis, I will tell you how and where to find these ratios. So, be with me for the next 8-10 minutes to enhance your financial knowledge.

So, let’s start the first part of this post with the financial ratio analysis.

If you are a beginner and want to learn stock market, I will highly recommend you to read this book first: Everything You Wanted to Know About Stock Market Investing


Quick note: You don’t need to worry about how to calculate these ratios or remember the formulas by-heart, as it will be already given in the financial websites. However, I will recommend you to go through this financial ratio analysis as it’s always beneficial to have good financial knowledge.


financial ratio analysis trade brains

Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know:

  1. Earnings Per Share (EPS):

    This is one of the key ratios and is really important to understand Earnings per share (EPS) before we study other ratios. EPS is basically the profit that a company has made over the last year divided by how many shares are on the market. Preferred shares are not included while calculating EPS.

    Earnings Per Share (EPS) = (Net income – dividends from preferred stock)/(Average outstanding shares)

    From the perspective of an investor, it’s always better to invest in a company with higher EPS as it means that the company is generating greater profits. Also, before investing in a company, you should check it’s EPS for the last 5 years. If the EPS is growing for these years, it’s a good sign and if the EPS is regularly falling or is erratic, then you should start searching another company.

  2. Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E)

    The Price to Earnings ratio is one of the most widely used financial ratio analysis among the investors for a very long time. A high P/E ratio generally shows that the investor is paying more for the share. As a thumb rule, a low P/E ratio is preferred while buying a stock, but the definition of ‘low’ varies from industries to industries. So, different sectors (Ex Automobile, Banks etc) have different P/E ratios for the companies in their sector, and comparing the P/E ratio of the company of one sector with P/E ratio of the company of another sector will be insignificant. However, you can use P/E ratio to compare the companies in the same sector, preferring one with low P/E. The P/E ratio is calculated using this formula:

    Price to Earnings Ratio= (Price Per Share)/( Earnings Per Share)

    It’s easier to find the find the price of the share as you can find it at the current closing stock price. For the earning per share, we can have either trailing EPS (earnings per share based on the past 12 months) or Forward EPS (Estimated basic earnings per share based on a forward 12-month projection. It’s easier to find the trailing EPS as we already have the result of the past 12 month’s performance of the company.

  3. Price to Book Ratio (P/B)

    Price to Book Ratio (P/B) is calculated by dividing the current price of the stock by the latest quarter’s book value per share. P/B ratio is an indication of how much shareholders are paying for the net assets of a company. Generally, a lower P/B ratio could mean that the stock is undervalued, but again the definition of lower varies from sector to sector.

    Price to Book Ratio = (Price per Share)/( Book Value per Share)

  4. Debt to Equity Ratio

    The debt-to-equity ratio measures the relationship between the amount of capital that has been borrowed (i.e. debt) and the amount of capital contributed by shareholders (i.e. equity). Generally, as a firm’s debt-to-equity ratio increases, it becomes riskier A lower debt-to-equity number means that a company is using less leverage and has a stronger equity position.

    Debt to Equity Ratio =(Total Liabilities)/(Total Shareholder Equity)

    As a thumb of rule, companies with a debt-to-equity ratio more than 1 are risky and should be considered carefully before investing.

  5. Return on Equity (ROE)

    Return on equity (ROE) is the amount of net income returned as a percentage of shareholders equity. ROE measures a corporation’s profitability by revealing how much profit a company generates with the money shareholders has invested. In other words, ROE tells you how good a company is at rewarding its shareholders for their investment.

    Return on Equity = (Net Income)/(Average Stockholder Equity)

    As a thumb rule, always invest in a company with ROE greater than 20% for at least last 3 years. A yearly increase in ROE is also a good sign.

  6. Price to Sales Ratio (P/S)

    The stock’s price/sales ratio (P/S) ratio measures the price of a company’s stock against its annual sales. P/S ratio is another stock valuation indicator similar to the P/E ratio.

    Price to Sales Ratio = (Price per Share)/(Annual Sales Per Share)

    The P/S ratio is a great tool because sales figures are considered to be relatively reliable while other income statement items, like earnings, can be easily manipulated by using different accounting rules.

  7. Current Ratio

    The current ratio is a key financial ratio for evaluating a company’s liquidity. It measures the proportion of current assets available to cover current liabilities. It is a company’s ability to pay its short-term liabilities with its short-term assets. If the ratio is over 1.0, the firm has more short-term assets than short-term debts. But if the current ratio is less than 1.0, the opposite is true and the company could be vulnerable

    Current Ratio = (Current Assets)/(Current Liabilities)

    As a thumb rule, always invest in a company with a current ratio greater than 1.

  8. Dividend Yield

    A stock’s dividend yield is calculated as the company’s annual cash dividend per share divided by the current price of the stock and is expressed in annual percentage.

    Dividend Yield = (Dividend per Share)/(Price per Share)*100

    For Example, If the share price of a company is Rs 100 and it is giving a dividend of Rs 10, then the dividend yield will be 10%. It totally depends on the investor whether he wants to invest in a high or a low dividend yielding company.

    Also Read: 4 Must-Know Dates for a Dividend Stock Investor

If you want to read further in details, I will recommend you to read this book: Everything You Wanted to Know About Stock Market Investing -Best selling book for stock market beginners. 

Now that we have completed the key financial ratio analysis, we should move towards where and how to find these financial ratios.

For an Indian Investor, you these are 3 big financial websites where you can find all the key ratios mentioned above along with other important financial information:

I, generally use money control to find the key financial ratio analysis. The mobile app for Money control is also very efficient and friendly and I will recommend you to use the mobile app.

Now, let me show you how to find these key ratios in Money Control. Let’s take a company, Say ‘Tata Motors’. Now, we will dig deep to find all the above-mentioned rations.

Financial ratio analysis -Steps to find the Key Ratios in Money Control:

  • Open http://www.moneycontrol.com/ and search for ‘Tata Motors’.
    financial ratio analysis 3
  • This will take you to the Tata Motor’s stock quote page.
    Scroll down to find the P/E, P/B, and Dividend Yield.
    financial ratio analysis 4financial ratio analysis 2
  • Now go to the ‘Financials’ tab and select ‘Ratio’ option [i.e. Financial  Ratio]
    Scroll down to find all the remaining financial ratios.
    financial ratio analysis 5

That’s all! These are the steps to do the key financial ratio analysis. Now, let me give you a quick summary of all the key financial ratios mentioned in the post.


Summary:

8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know:

  1. Earnings Per Share (EPS) – Increasing for last 5 years
  2. Price to Earnings Ratio (P/E) – Low compared to companies in the same sector
  3. Price to Book Ratio (P/B) – Low compared companies in the same sector
  4. Debt to Equity Ratio – Should be less than 1
  5. Return on Equity (ROE) – Should be greater than 20% 
  6. Price to Sales Ratio (P/S) – Smaller ratio (less than 1) is preferred
  7. Current Ratio – Should be greater than 1
  8. Dividend Yield – Depends on Investor/ Increasing preferred

In addition, here is a checklist (that you should download) which can help you to select a fundamentally strong company based on the financial ratios.

Feel free to share this image with ones whom you think can get benefit from the checklist.

5 simple financial ratios for stock picking

I hope this post on ‘8 Financial Ratio Analysis that Every Stock Investor Should Know’ is useful for the readers. If you have any doubt or need any further clarification, feel free to comment below. I will be happy to help you.

dividend dates explained

Dividend Dates Explained – Must Know Dates for Investors

Dividend Dates Explained – Must Know Dates for Investors:

There are lots of investors in the stock market who buys a stock only to receive dividends. A regular, consistent and increasing dividend per year is what these investors are looking for. In general, those investors who are planning for a long-term investment with some yearly income invest in dividend stocks.

What is a ‘Dividend’?

A dividend is a distribution of a portion of a company’s earnings, decided by the board of directors, to a class of its shareholders. Dividends can be issued as cash payments, as shares of stock, or other property. A company’s net profits can be allocated to shareholders via a dividend. Larger, established companies tend to issue regular dividends as they seek to maximize shareholder wealth in ways aside from supernormal growth.

Souce: Investopedia

Here is the list of some of the highest dividend paying companies in India: 10 Best Dividend Stocks in India That Will Make Your Portfolio Rich.

The timing of buying/selling is the most important factor for receiving dividends. You don’t want to buy these stocks if you won’t be getting any dividend, right? For example, if you buy these stocks after a certain time, the previous seller might get the dividend as he was holding the stock when the company was recording the name of the shareholder before distribution of dividends.

Therefore, it’s very important that you monitor the dates during the press conference (corporate announcements) by the company’s board of directors. It’s during the press conference when the company announces how much dividends they will give to the shareholders and the dates when the stockholders will receive their dividends.

Also read: How to follow stock Market, 10 Must-Read books for Stock Market Investors

Understanding the dates mentioned in the corporate announcement is quite important for the investors as it decides the timing of trading of these dividend stocks. And this post is for explaining those dates only. So, be with me for the next 5-8 minutes to understand the dividend dates explained for newbies.

Want to learn more? Here is a best selling book on stock market which I highly recommend to read: Beating the street by Peter Lynch

Must Know Dividend Dates for Investors

In general, there are 4 important dividend dates that every investor should know. They are:

  1. Dividend Declaration Date
  2. Record Date
  3. Ex-Dividend Date
  4. Payment Date

Among the all four, the Ex-Dividend day is of uttermost importance. You will understand the importance of this date as you read this complete article on the dividend dates explained.

dividend dates explained 2

For now, let’s understand all these dates first:

1. Dividend Declaration Date:

This is the date on which the company’s board of directors declares the dividends for the stockholders. The conference includes the date of dividend distribution, size of the dividend and the record date.

2. Record Date:

On the dividend declaration day, the company also announces the record date. The record date is the date on which your name should be present on the company’s list of shareholders i.e. record book, to get the dividend. Shareholders who are not registered as of this date on the company’s record book will not receive the dividend. According to the company, you are only eligible to get the dividends, if your name is on their book till this record date.

3. Ex-Dividend Date:

The Ex-dividend date is usually two days before the record date. In order to be able to get the dividend, you will have to purchase the stock before the ex-dividend date. If you buy the stock on or after the Ex-dividend date, then you won’t get the dividend, instead, the previous seller will get the dividend.

After the company sets the date of record, the ex-dividend date is set by the stock exchange. So, the two days before the record date is generally used by the stock exchange to give the name of the shareholders to the company. The investors who buy the stock on or after the ex-dividend date won’t be listed in the record book of the company. So, if you purchase a stock on or after the ex-dividend date, you won’t receive a dividend until it is declared for the next time period.

4. Payment Date:

This is the date set the by the company, on which the dividends deposited are paid to the stockholders. Only those stockholders who bought the stock before the Ex-dividend date are entitled to get the dividend.

So, I hope you have understood all the dividend dates explained above. As I already mentioned earlier, the Ex-dividend date is the most important date among all. I will summarize the above dividend dates explained here:

Type Declaration Date Ex-Dividend Date Record Date Payment Date
Notes The date the dividend is announced by the company The date before which you must own the stock to be entitled to the dividend. The date by which you must be on the company’s record books as a shareholder to receive the dividend. The date the dividend is paid to shareholders.

Now, let me give you an example of the company’s board of director’s press conference so that you get a good knowledge of the above dividend dates explained.

Hindustan Zinc Dividend:

“Shares of Hindustan Zinc will turn ex-dividend on Wednesday. The company is paying ₹27.50 a share as second interim dividend for fiscal 2016-17. The record date for the dividend is March 30. 2017” (You can read the complete news here.)

In the above announcement, the company announced two important points-

  • Dividend =  ₹27.50 per share
  • Record date = March 30, 2017

The expected Ex-dividend date should be 28th march, 2017 i.e. those investors who buy the stock of Hindustan zinc before 28th Match will be entitled to receive the dividend.

Further, if you want to know the dates of the upcoming dividends payment date, you can get it from the money control website: www.moneycontrol.com/stocks/marketinfo/dividends_declared/

I hope this post about ‘Dividend dates explained’ is helpful to the readers. If you have any doubts or need any further help on the topic ‘dividend dates explained’ feel free to comment below. I will be happy to help you out.

New to stocks and confused where to start? Here’s an amazing online course for the newbie investors: INVESTING IN STOCKS- THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR BEGINNERS. Enroll now and start your stock market journey today!

dividend dates explained 3

What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India cover

What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India?

What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India? This is one of the most asked questions by the beginners when they start investing in stock market. Different newbie investors ask the same question in different formats. It goes like this:

What should be the ideal amount to start investing in the Stock Market?

What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India?

I want to invest in stock market but I do not know how much to invest?

What should be the minimum amount can I invest in stock market for long term?

I want to invest in stock market, but I don’t have much money. Is there any any minimum number of stocks that I must buy?

The general answer to all these questions is ‘there is no minimum money required to start investing in the stock market in India.

You can buy stocks for even less than Rs 10 also if you find an interesting one (Indian stock exchanges BSE & NSE has a number of stocks pricing less than even Rs 10). You don’t need to have thousands or lakhs to start trading in India. Any amount from which you can buy a stock is decent enough to start trading, no minimum money to start trading in the stock market required.

Here is a list of a few popular companies whose stock prices are less than Rs 100 (at the time of writing this post).

S.No.NameCurrent Price (Rs)Market Cap (Rs Cr)
1NBCC36.96642
2Ashok Leyland83.724570.36
3Natl. Aluminium45.658516.54
4JM Financial90.657625.2
5Welspun India505023.63
6NLC India57.67987.03
7Adani Power63.2524395.14
8JSW Energy70.211529.37
9Ujjivan Small54.99487.95
10S A I L46.6519268.9
11H U D C O38.457697.31
12ITI94.88503.56
13M R P L43.957702.68
14B H E L44.615530
15Yes Bank47.112012.72
16Tata Power Co.57.7515620.07
17Federal Bank90.9518119.75
18Union Bank (I)54.7518739.93
19IDFC First Bank45.4521768.09
20Oriental Bank52.47179.9
21Bank of India70.723167.85
22Punjab Natl.Bank65.0543827.87
23Vakrangee52.35540.69
24IDBI Bank37.238615.81
25I D F C37.25938.45

You can easily invest in these companies.  Funny, the stock prices of these companies are even less than the Ola or Uber ride fare that you take in your hometown.  Still, people speculate that buying stocks are expensive. In addition, you can also find a complete list of stocks whose price ranges from Rs 1 to 100 here.

So, the answer to the question of ‘what is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India?’ is that there is no minimum money limit required for starting stock trading in India.

However, is this all that you wanted to learn from the topic of the post? I don’t think so.

The next big question should be then ‘How much should I invest in the stock initially -if there is no minimum money I need to start stock trading?.

The answer is that if you are new to the market and still in the learning phase, it is always recommended to start small. Invest as low as possible and focus on learning. Anything between Rs 500- Rs 1000 is good enough. You really don’t want to lose thousands of money at the start of your investment journey (and then promising angrily to yourself that you won’t ever return to the market).

But, this doesn’t mean that you should take this amount as a strict rule for your initial investment. Suppose, if you found a stock, which is a bit costlier, say Rs 1200. But you have done your homework, read the stock fundamentals, and are confident that the stock will give a good return in the future, then, you should go for it. Anyways, as a thumb rule for the beginners, anything between Rs 500- Rs 1000 can be used as the first stock market investment amount.

Want to learn more? Here is a best selling book on stock market which I highly recommend to read: Beating the street by Peter Lynch

The best advantage of this thumb rule is that you won’t lose too much if things don’t work out as you imagined. Maybe, you misinterpreted the stock or did the fundamental study wrong, or the stock price fell due to some bad fortune. Still, you won’t be affected too much financially by the loss. Nonetheless, this investment will teach you a few lessons. As the saying goes:

— Failures are the best teachers.

From your first investment, you will learn a lot. Remember, it’s not always about winning. You should always remember this famous quote ‘Sometimes you win, & sometimes you learn’. Further, from your first investment, you will learn more important things. You will learn what things to do and moreover, you will learn what things not to do. Besides, losing small money won’t affect your morale and you can come back in the game again, and next time even more prepared and informed.

On the other hand, if you win i.e. the stock performed well, then congratulations. You have done a good job! 

Your first investment teaches you a great lesson if it is a failure. On the other hand, if your first stock is a winner, it gives tremendous joy and becomes a memory for the lifetime. Both ways, you’re gonna receive something. Either a lesson or joy.

In my case, I bought three stocks during my first investment. Out of three, two performed well and the third underperformed for three continuous months. Although the overall portfolio was in profit, still the returns were not as good as I expected. Therefore, I sold the third stock after the third month. (Quick spoiler: The third stock became a multi-bagger in the next two years. But, I don’t have any regrets.)

For beginners, I will suggest following their stock portfolio for three-five months before investing heavily in the market. The initial big profits on your stock might give you great confidence to keep buying additional stocks. But you shouldn’t be greedy at that moment.  You must remember that for beginners, it’s more important to learn how to do value investing, that to earn money. And once you have learned the basics, the game is yours.

Also read: How to create your Stock Portfolio?

minimum money I need to start stock trading-4

— 100 minus your age rule

There is a famous rule regarding how much you should invest in the stock market and widely known as ‘100 minus your age rule’. The rule is based on the principle of gradually reducing your risk as you get older. The rules go like this. The percentage of the stock holding in your net worth should be equal to 100 minus your age.’

For example, Let’s say your age is 20 and your total savings till date is Rs 1000. Then, the amount that you should invest in the stock market should be (100-20) = 80% of your total net worth. In other words, you should invest Rs 800 in the stock market if you are of age 20 from a total saving of Rs 1000.

You can read the complete post about ‘100 minus your age rule’ here.

— The X/3 Rule:

This is another popular rule for beginners to reduce risk while investing. The rule says to invest the only x/3 amount in the beginning if x is the total amount you intended to invest in a stock. After a few weeks, you can invest your next x/3 amount to the stock if it’s doing good. And finally the last x/3 again after another few months.

For example, if you intend to invest Rs 10,000 in a stock, don’t buy from the whole amount all in one go. Invest only 10,000/3=  Rs 3,333 initially. If you find your investment grow, then you can add Rs 3,333 in the next round of investment and the last Rs 3,334 in the final round. The rule greatly minimizes the risk and helps in averaging out the purchase price.

Anyways, a minor problem with this rule is that it reduces the focused amount. Therefore, the final profit might be a little less than expected if the whole amount was invested at the same time. Still, it’s a great rule for stock market beginners and helped a lot of newbies to reduce their risk and losses significantly.

There is one more rule called the ‘75% profit rule’. However, it is more like a hypothesis that a rule. It states that if 75% of stocks in your portfolio are doing good, then you can invest further. For example, if you have bought 4 stocks and 3 of them are doing good, then it means that your strategy is working and you can increase your investment. The chances of all the stocks in your portfolio(4/4) working great is very limited. Even Warren Buffett, the greatest investor of all time, has some stocks in the portfolio which gives him negative returns.

In short, if 75% of your stocks are doing great, it means that your strategy is good and it’s not the luck that is driving your portfolio. In other words, if you have only one stock in your portfolio and it’s growing fast, there might be a luck factor. But if 7 out of 10 stocks in your portfolio are growing, it’s more because you did your research correctly.

That’s all. These are the basics tips and tricks for beginners to invest in the stock market.  Also remember the answer to the original question ‘what is the minimum money I need to start stock trading?’ is that there is no minimum money you need to start stock trading. That is no lower limit for that minimum money you need to start stock trading.

minimum money I need to start stock trading-3

One more thing I would like to add to this post. There are also some additional charges while buying a stock online and the buyer have to pay them. They are generally less than 1% of the amount of the transaction. The additional charges are brokerage charge, Service charge, STT, etc. Therefore, you also have to keep these charges in mind during buying a stock. Although these are a very small amount, still they will add up in the final amount of the stock that you bought.

Hence, for all those who are asking ‘What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India?’, the answer is that there isn’t minimum money you need to start trading in India. Anything that suits you is good enough for the market. Any money at which you can buy a stock works fine for entering the market. Any amount that you are ready to invest, is great to start stock trading in India.

Lastly, I hope my post ‘What is the minimum money I need to start stock trading in India’ is useful for the readers. If you need any further clarification or have any doubts, feel free to comment below. I’ll be happy to help you out.

Closing Note: If you are new to stocks and confused where to start, here’s an amazing online course for the newbie investors: INVESTING IN STOCKS- THE COMPLETE COURSE FOR BEGINNERS. Enroll now and start your stock market journey today!

top 10 warren buffett quotes on investing

Top 10 Warren Buffett Quotes on Investing.

Top 10 Warren Buffett Quotes on Investing:

Warren Buffett, the most renowned investor of all time and one of the richest men on earth. He’s is probably the most famous figure when it comes to investment. The veteran investor and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway, the American multinational conglomerate holding company are known for his investing prowess. This clever stock picker has also an amazing his wit & sense of humor.

As the world’s best investor, the people are constantly looking at Warren Buffett for investment advice. A quick google search will give you millions of results about the famous quotations by the legendary investor. The philanthropist investor, who is pledged to give 99% of his total worth to the philanthropic cause, has many of the famous quotations on investing which are worth sharing. So, today I have brought this list of the top 10 Warren Buffett Quotes on Investing. Here it goes.

 Top 10 Warren Buffett Quotes on Investing.

“Price is what you pay. Value is what you get.”


“Rule No.1: Never lose money. Rule No.2: Never forget rule No.1.”


“Only buy something that you’d be perfectly happy to hold if the market shut down for 10 years.”


“We simply attempt to be fearful when others are greedy and to be greedy only when others are fearful.”


“Risk comes from not knowing what you’re doing.”


“If you are not willing to own a stock for 10 years, do not even think about owning it for 10 minutes.”


“We don’t have to be smarter than the rest. We have to be more disciplined than the rest.”


“Cash combined with courage in a time of crisis is priceless.”


“If you have more than 120 or 130 I.Q. points, you can afford to give the rest away. You don’t need extraordinary intelligence to succeed as an investor.”


“Unless you can watch your stock holding decline by 50% without becoming panic-stricken, you should not be in the stock market.”


Wanna read more from the greatest investors himself. Here is a book that I highly recommend you to read: Gems from Warren Buffett – Wit and Wisdom from 34 Years of Letters to Shareholders

I hope the quotes from this oracle of Omaha have some impact on the readers and they can also brighten their path from the lights of this great investor. I have included most of the best quotes by Warren Buffett in the top 10 Warren Buffett quotes on investing list.

Further, if you think of any other quote which you want to add to the list, please comment below. I will be happy to respond to the comments on the post ‘the top 10 Warren Buffett quotes on investing’.

top 10 warren buffett quotes on investing

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